So you want a Digital Media Server but don’t know where to start? http://nascompares.com/2016/04/28/choosing-the-right-nas-for-media-plex-versus-kodi-and-xbmc/

♫ ? CREATE PLEX ACCOUNT http://bit.ly/PlxAFF4
♫ ? GET PLEX PASS http://bit.ly/A4PPASS

But which is for you?

Larger start-up cost. Plex is a proprietary software (that is to say a paid for ‘brand’), however the initial Plex software and PMS setup software are free. All media is held on a single host/server device which will need at least a mid range machine with either an x86 processor or ARM v7 CPU to handle issues like transcoding your media between devices (larger files being sent to smaller devices that require downscaling). As all the ‘work’ is handled by the Plex Media Server (PC/NAS) and the destination device works just as a receiver.

+ a paid for Premium serviced to utilise extra features that go above and beyond media (many of which are already provided by Synology or QNAP in your NAS once purchased at no additional cost)

KODI is an open source and standalone. Much, much less expensive in the short-term. Media is held on multiple network enabled devices and is shared throughout them between each KODI client device (smartphone, laptop, pc, tablet, NAS, etc)

No big financial outlay is required at the start for a NAS, however transcoding/re-encoding of files to be accessible to host devices is done by the host device itself. So a 1080p file being viewed in .MKV format that is way, way over the top for a smartphone will be required to transcode the file and have to work hard at it! But is ably supported on ARM devices such as lower end NAS devices and Raspberry Pi

The real cost of KODI in the long run is having a series of KODI supported devices that are mid range in power

Next let’s talk Accessing your Media

Single Server source and data is mostly accessible via a web interface (with the exception of mobile apps which are dressed up versions of the same).

Media can be readily and easily accessed remotely via the internet (so outside your home network). Chiefly designed to give you the ability to access and share your media outside of your home network. Client based access on every device giving you access to your devices contents and those accessible on the same home network (same router/network) via installed mobile apps or desktop software.

Accessing outside of your home network, though not impossible, is difficult and by no means user-friendly. Chiefly designed to give you access to media across all devices on your home network – not external access. You can set up a web server but has a steep learning curve.

Next User Interface and customisation

Media is organised in a far more graphical fashion –those familiar with Amazon Instant, Netflix etc will be at home with it. Automatically scanning and updating libraries (new additions, images, details, etc), as well as giving you the ability to create playlists and keep track of your watched-unwatched media. This is especially helpful via the web-interface and largely possible due to that SINGLE server architecture design.

No real design customisation is available, and most fully featured add-ons are Paid-for. Though it does let you add numerous online content such as TED talks, Youtube, vimeo, etc

Heavy emphasis on the cross axis design… categories left to right and sub-categories up and down.

Much more file based. Playlist etc are possible but this is more for someone who wants to see more information on screen about their media.

VERY customisable with a community of modders and users making newer and better skins and interfaces. Some of these are geneuinely innovative and give a real sense of individuality.

Much larger support and choice of internet TV channel and VoD services. Really spoilt for choice upto and including near live TV services

Next Overall Support on client and host

As it is proprietary software, they have the support you would come to expect from a company with Paid for add ons… customer service line, technical support as well as paid for developers.

More readily available in App form on more devices. From consoles like PS4 and Xbox one all the way through to Roku, Amazon fire etc – however many of these require additional payment (around 5 dollars).

For online/remote steaming of your own media when away from home, it is the front runner.
Being an open-source software, you do not get the support you would from a corporate cooperated company. They is a huge community of users, support members and forums with guides, tutorials and updates but no real LIVE/instant support

Kodi is available on many platforms, though not as many as PLEX, however a few require you to go into the setting and configure the software manually to optimise the software. This lack of uniformity across platform case result in slight performance crippling on lower powered devices as they communicate with devices on the network on different platforms.

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Update: 116 Kodi add-ons you may be watching which could break copyright laws

http://wiltshiretimes.co.uk/news/15104082.116_Kodi_add_ons_you_re_probably_watching_which_may_breach_copyright_laws/

Just what is Kodi ,how do you use it and the Most excellent Add-ons? All you might want to understand the streaming software application

Everyone is speaking of it – nonetheless what’s Kodi? If you find yourself concerned about what the latest phenomenon is concerning, explore our guidebook.

The boxes make available access to an application known as Kodiwhich, that allows viewers to watch copyrighted content without paying for a monthly subscription.

It has been revealed that about 20 million people all over the UK are using it and there is a good deal argument over whether the streaming app is actually lawful.

What is Kodi?

Putting it simple, Kodi is open-source software application designed specifically with home entertainment in mind – and it is totally free.

Although it was earlier planned for the Microsoft Xbox and called Xbox Media Center (XBMC), the program continues to develop, breeding a community of its own.

Compared to services like Chromecast or Plex, Kodi is managed by the non-profit XBMC Foundation, but it’s constantly being changed and advanced by tons of developers around the globe.

From its creation in the year 2003, Kodi has been shaped by over Five hundred software programmers and over 200 linguists.

Exactly what does Kodi do?

Kodi basically turns any computer, mobile phone or tablet PC into a digital set-top box or streamer, offering users the cabability to stream files on the internet.

Meant to operate on computers and household servers connected to bigger TVs, Kodi draws content directly to your living room.

Yet, recent community-led products mean it’s now possible to run the software on chosen smartphones and tablets.

Distinct from other sorts of TV streamers, Kodi isn’t held back by licensing or a curated application store, therefore it enables you to download different community-made software applications, and watch whatever you like.

Further, Kodi’s purpose-built UI helps make browsing through your content effortless – and you can even personalise and add to it as you prefer.

The application features what its developers call a “10-foot UI”, that means it can be read from a theoretical distance about 10foot away – and thanks to a variety of built-in codes, people can check out movies, photos and podcasts easily and quickly.

On scaled-down devices, Kodi supplies a similar experience, but can be hooked up to a bigger TV for big-screen viewing.

What’s compatible with Kodi?

Kodi is offered on just about each device you may think of. The media centre software package is easy to download and install, and appropriate for Windows, OS X, Linux, Android – as well as the Raspberry Pi micro computer.

For those people employing iOS, the operation is slightly more elaborate: iPhone owners will surely have to make sure their mobile is jailbroken in advance of getting it.

Is it legitimate?

The straightforward answer is sure. In its most elementary form, Kodi is a piece of streaming software program designed to display content on a multitude of devices, which means it’s totally legal.

Having said that, much like a internet browser, torrent client, or another computing tool, it’s possible to make use of Kodi for less cut and dry intentions.

Most excellent Legal Add-ons for Kodi

Kodi receives a bad rap for piracy, but there’s huge sums of authorized things you may add to it for your enjoyment.
http://www.windowscentral.com/best-legal-add-ons-kodi

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